Eine Kleine Nichtmusik

Witty and pertinent observations on matters of great significance OR Incoherent jottings on total irrelevancies OR Something else altogether OR All of the above

Monday, December 20, 2010

Has Ed Miliband learned nothing from the disastrous Blair years?

Not much, if his behaviour last week when a former Drugs minister, now a back-bench MP, was unwise enough to speak truth to power (or at least speak truth to the Leader of Her Majesty's Opposition).

Ainsworth, who claimed that his departure from the frontbenches now allowed him to express his "long-held view" on drugs policy, is due to lay out his case later today at a debate in Westminster Hall.

He said his ministerial stint in the Home Office made him see that prohibition failed to reduce the harm that drugs cause in the UK, while his time as defence secretary with specific responsibilities in Afghanistan, "showed to me that the war on drugs creates the very conditions that perpetuate the illegal trade, while undermining international development and security".

He called on those on all sides of the debate to support "an independent, evidence-based review, exploring all policy options, including further resourcing the war on drugs, decriminalising the possession of drugs, and legally regulating their production and supply".


However,

Ed Miliband, the Labour leader, said today that the legalisation of drugs would send out "the wrong message" to young people as he distanced himself from a Labour backbencher's calls for a "grown-up debate" on the issue.

Because nothing says "strong leader" like avoiding grown-up debate.

Honest to God. After the debacle of the govermment sacking its senior advisor on drugs (David Nutt) because he gave advice (the same as Bob Ainsworth's, that prohibition has not only failed to cure the nation's drug problem but actively encourages it) which failed to fit party orthodoxy, you might think Milibamnd would realise what an ass he's making of himself. What is his problem - what is Labour's problem - with basing policy on evidence and science rather than myths and hysteria? I foolishly thought - though the Nutt affair brought me down to Earth - that the Mystic Meg school of policy-making had been abandoned when Blair was sacked.

So: a few hundred thousand more lives destroyed by drug addiction, a few billion pounds more in profits for the Taleban, a few billion for the drug lords in Colombia. Job done, without the need for a single thought. Sorry, Ed, you just demonstrated why you're unfit to be Prime Minister.

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